How to play Thirteen & Game Rules with Video – PlayingCardDecks.com

(Above is the set up for a game of Thirteen)

(Above is the set up for a game of Thirteen)

Card Game Rules

Thirteen is a four player trick-taking card game that requires a standard 52 playing card deck. In Thirteen, 2s are high and 3s are low. The suits are ranked with Hearts being the highest, then Diamonds, Clubs, and Spades. The objective of Thirteen is to be the first player to get rid of their cards. 

For other trick-taking card games, see our guides for President and Bezique.

If you are looking for cards to play Thirteen with, check out a standard pack here or one of our more recent arrivals here.

Set Up

Before game play can begin, a dealer must be selected. Each player draws one card from a shuffled deck. The player with the lowest card becomes the dealer. The dealer shuffles the deck and passes out thirteen cards to each player in a clockwise fashion. 

How to Play

The player with the 3 of Spades makes the first move. Going clockwise, players can either player a card that is of equal rank (with a higher suit) or higher than the card previously played. Once nobody can play a higher card, the pile is removed and the last person to play a card starts the new pile.

Cards can be played as singles, pairs, three of a kinds, four of a kinds or a sequence of 3 or more. Players must however follow whatever the lead play was. If somebody leads with a single, players cannot beat it with a double or etc. 

Bombs

A four of a kind and a double sequence of three cards are called bombs. Bombs can beat a single 2. A double sequence of four cards can beat a pair of 2s and a double sequence of five cards can beat three 2s.

Miscellaneous Rules

If a player has four 2s or a sequence of 3 to Ace, they immediately win the game.

The last card in a sequence determines its suit.

The player who gets rid of all of their cards first wins the game.

Looking for more card games to play?  Check out this article:

40+ Great Card Games For All Occasions

About the author: John Taylor is a content writer and freelancer through the company Upwork.com. You may view his freelancing profile here. He has a B. A. in English, with a specialty in technical writing, from Texas A&M University and a M. A. in English from the University of Glasgow. You may view his previous articles about card games here and his LinkedIn profile here.

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Last update date: 08/29/20

How to play Carousel & Game Rules – PlayingCardDecks.com

(Above is an ending layout from a game of Carousel Rummy)

(Above is an ending layout from a game of Carousel Rummy)

Card Game Rules

Carousel is a Rummy type game for 2-5 players. For 2 players, Carousel requires a standard deck of 52 playing cards and 1 Joker. For 3-5 players, Carousel requires 2 standard decks of 52 playing cards and 2 Joker. In Carousel Aces can be High or Low, however they cannot connect a King and 2. The objective of Carousel is to play all of your cards by melding them.

If you are looking for cards to play Carousel with, check out a standard deck here or one of our newest arrivals here.

For more Rummy type games, check out our guides for Canasta and Gin.

Set-Up

Before game play can begin, a dealer must be selected. Each player draws one card from a shuffled deck. The player with the lowest card becomes the dealer. Ties are broken by a redraw.

The dealer then shuffles the deck and passes out ten cards one at a time to each player. The remaining cards form the stock pile.

How to Play

Starting with the player left of the dealer, players try to meld off as much cards as they can. A player begins their turn by first drawing from the stock. If they cannot make any melds with their cards, they draw another card from the stock. If they still can’t make any melds, they draw a final card from the stock and end their turn, even if they can make a meld with the drawn card. 

Notably, a player may rearrange all of the melded cards as long as they return to valid melds at the end of their turn.

Melds

A player makes a meld by either having three or more of a kind or by having three or more of a run. A run is made of three or more cards of the same suit in increasing or decreasing order. When a player makes a meld they lay it face up on the table. 

Melds are communal, meaning once a meld is made, another player can continue the sequence/set with their own cards.

Joker

Jokers are wildcards. If a player has the card that the Joker is replacing, they can swap the two and get the joker to make their own melds. 

Knocking

Once a player has a hand of 5 or less points, a player can choose to “knock” and end the round.

Scoring

In Carousel:

Jokers are worth 25 points.

Face cards are worth 10 points.

Cards 2-10 are worth their face value.

Aces are worth 1 point.

Once somebody Knocks, the player with the least number of points in their hand wins the difference between their opponents’ hand and their own.

If a player Knocks after playing all of their cards, they win a 25 point bonus.

If a player Knocks while somebody else has a lower hand than them, the person with the lower hand wins the points for the round and a 10 point bonus.

For more information about Carousel, check out The Rummy Rule book here or Pagat.com’s article here.

Looking for more card games to play?  Check out this article:

40+ Great Card Games For All Occasions

About the author: John Taylor is a content writer and freelancer through the company Upwork.com. You may view his freelancing profile here. He has a B. A. in English, with a specialty in technical writing, from Texas A&M University and a M. A. in English from the University of Glasgow. You may view his previous articles about card games here and his LinkedIn profile here.

John Taylor Head shot

Last update date: 08/29/20

How to play Faro & Game Rules with Video – PlayingCardDecks.com

(This is the typical set up for the game Faro)

(This is the typical set up for the game Faro)

Card Game Rules

Faro is a historical casino game for two or more players. It requires a standard 52 card deck, an extra set of 13 cards for each rank, a set of betting chips for each player, and a penny for each player. In Faro, Aces are low and Kings are high. The objective is to win the most bets. 

If you are looking for cards to play Faro with, check out a standard deck here or check out one of our recent arrivals here.

For more casino games, check out our guides for In-Between and Baccarat.

You can also find an 1882 rule book to Faro here.

Set-Up

To set-up a game a Faro, place the extra 13 cards in two rows face up in the middle of the playing table. These cards make up the tableau. From the top left going right, the card order should be King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9, and 8. The 7 should be placed to the right of and halfway down from the 8. The 6 should then be placed to the left of the 7 and directly below the 8. From the 6 going left, the card order should be 5, 4, 3, 2, and Ace.

The dealer sits opposite of the players with a faced down deck of shuffled cards in-front of them. Players bring their own chips to bet with. Every player receives a penny to bet against cards with.

 

How to Play

The dealer begins the game by showing everyone the top card of the deck. The card is then placed face up to the side of the gameplay area. Players then place bets on one of the cards in the tableau. Next the dealer draws two card from the deck and places them face up for all the players to see. The first card is the loser. The second card is the winner. Bets on the first card are lost. Bets on the second card receive 1:1 payout from the dealer.

The flipped over cards are placed to the side and another round begins. Players can move their bets around, keep them where they were or begin placing bets on multiple cards. Multiple players can bet on the same card. Gameplay continues until the deck runs out.

 

Misc. Rules

A player can bet that the winning card is higher than the losing card by placing chips next to the deck. Payout is 1:1.

A player can bet on the losing card by placing a penny on top of their chip. 

When the deck has three cards left, players can bet on the order of the final draw.

If the losing and winning cards are of the same rank, then the dealer receives half of the bet made.

If a player places a bet on a card that has already been drawn four times from the deck, the first person (player or dealer) who notices can say “dead bet” and receive the chips.

History

(A game of Faro in 1895)

(A game of Faro in 1895)

Faro was first played in 18th century France. It was named after the picture of an Egyptian pharaoh that appeared on many French playing cards. The game spread eastward towards Russia and eventually reached the American West in the 1800’s. By 1925, the game became virtually extinct as Baccarat and Blackjack took over as the more popular games at casinos.

For more information about Faro, check out David Parlett’s article here or Pagat.com’s article here.

 

Looking for more card games to play?  Check out this article:

40+ Great Card Games For All Occasions

About the author: John Taylor is a content writer and freelancer through the company Upwork.com. You may view his freelancing profile here. He has a B. A. in English, with a specialty in technical writing, from Texas A&M University and a M. A. in English from the University of Glasgow. You may view his previous articles about card games here and his LinkedIn profile here.

John Taylor Head shot

Last update date: 0/25/21